Sexually Transmitted Disease and Infection information

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Chlamydia trachomatis is the UK's most prolific sexually transitted disease
Gonorrhoea is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae.
Non-specific urethritis (NSU) is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases among men
Syphilis is a  sexually transmitted infection on the increase
Syphilis is a  sexually transmitted infection on the increase
Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the herpes simplex viruses
Genital warts are soft wart-like growths on the genitals caused by a viral skin disease
If abnormal vaginal discharge can be due to a sexually transmitted disease
HIV means 'human immunodeficiency virus'. It can be acquired through unprotected sex
Pubic lice are parasitic insects often found in the genital area
Scabies is an infestation of the skin with the microscopic mite Sarcoptes scabei
Molluscum contagiosum is a common, mild viral infection that affects the skin causing small pearly white papules
Chancroid is a sexually transmitted infectious disease characterized by painful ulcers
Thrush is often mistaken as an STD
A list of resources for sexually transmitted diseases and infections
STD is an independant site with information on sexually transmitted dieases

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Chlamydia

WHAT IS CHLAMYDIA?
Chlamydia is the UK's number 1 bacterial STD/STI infection.The bacterium Chlamydia Trachomatis is highly contagious and is prevalent in young adults 18-24.
HOW IS CHLAMYDIA TRANSMITTED?
Chlamydia can be transmitted during vaginal, anal, or oral sex.
WHAT ARE THE SIGNS & SYMPTOMS OF CHLAMYDIA?
Chlamydia often shows no signs and recent studies suggest 75% of women do not experience any symptoms and 50% of men.
WHAT ARE THE LONG TERM COMPLICATIONS OF CHLAMYDIA?
Unless Chlamydia is treated the untreated infection can spread into the uterus or fallopian tubes. This can cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID).Recent studies suggest 40% of women go on to develop PID if the infection is not treated. PID can cause permanent damage to the fallopian tubes, uterus, and surrounding tissues. The damage can lead to chronic pelvic pain, infertility, and ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy outside the uterus).
Complications among men are rar however infection can spread to the epididymis (a tube that carries sperm from the testis), causing pain, fever, and, rarely, sterility.
Rarely chlamydiacan develop into an inflammation of the eye and urethra (Reiter's syndrome).
HOW IS CHLAMYDIA DIAGNOSED?
There are several test for Chlamydia.
A specimen be collected from a site such as the penis or cervix usually conducted at a registered STD clinic or by some practices.
Home testing kits which use an enzyme to stain the cells infected with chlamydia trachomatis.
Laboratory urine tests which analyse the cells infected with chlamydia which drop off the bladder and urethra into the urine.
HOW IS CHLAMYDIA TREATED?
Chlamydia can be easily treated and cured with antibiotics. There is no evidence that creams applied to chlamydia can cure the condition, the only safe cure is with antibiotics.
All sexual partners should be informed so they can check their status.
CAN THE INFECTION RECUR?
Re-infection can occur at any time if a sexual partner is infected with chlamydia. The only way to prevent infection is to use protective sex (condom).
WHAT SHOULD I DO?
If you are worried that you may have chlamydia, contact your doctor or visit your local STD office, details of whichj can be found on the main page of this website or in the yellow pages. Alternatively you could use one of the CE registered home tests available.

 

 

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